The Agreement On Government Procurement

The revised GPA, which came into force on 6 April 2014, is attracting increasing attention around the world, but the liberalisation of public procurement is not a completely new idea. Within the OECD, efforts have been made at an early stage to ensure that public procurement is subject to internationally accepted trade rules. The case was then included in the Tokyo trade negotiations under the GATT in 1976. Any company in a signatory country wishing to sell GPA goods or services to a purchasing entity in another signatory country, which is listed in Schedule I of the GPA, may benefit from this agreement. The World Trade Organization estimates the value of the public procurement opportunities covered by the agreement at several hundred billion dollars a year. The Public Procurement Agreement (GPA) is a multi-lateral agreement, under the auspices of the World Trade Organization (WTO), which governs the purchase of goods and services by the public authorities of the contracting parties, based on the principles of openness, transparency and non-discrimination. The MPA applies to purchases by any contractual means, including purchase, lease or lease with or without an option to purchase. It applies to companies that each signatory country has listed in Schedule I (link offsite) of the agreement. Appendix I of Schedule I is the list of entities covered by headquarters, Schedule 2 of central government entities and Schedule 3 of the other entities. On March 30, 2012, the parties to the GPA adopted a review of the GPA. The revised agreement expands the markets covered by the GPA to provide U.S.

products, services and suppliers with new opportunities to participate in centralized and sub-centralized procurement in other GPA parties. The revised agreement also provides for a substantial improvement in the text of the treaty by modernising the text to take into account current procurement practices and to clarify its commitments. The revised agreement enters into force for the parties who accepted it on the 30th day after it was tabled by two-thirds of the parties to the current agreement and, subsequently, for each of the parties that accept it on the 30th day following its adoption. When a undersigned government feels that its rights under this agreement are nullified or compromised by another signatory, it may request the initiation of WTO dispute settlement procedures to resolve the issue.